Tag Archives: goals

Top 5 – How to Let Go and Enjoy the Festivities While You Work

CrowdAre you careening  head long into the end of the year at warp speeds or are you spinning on the spot in a dizzying spin of deadlines?  Maybe you are heading gracefully to a gentle close or galloping to the post with style?

However you bring the year to a close the conflicting demands of deadlines and festivities are upon us and it can be difficult to navigate a balanced course through the final weeks of the year.  Do not fear Happening People come to your aid with our Top 5 – How to Let Go and Enjoy the Festivities While You Work

1. Tidy Up Loose Ends
As you launch into all the fun and festivities the years end brings it can be easy to get so caught up in the goings on that staying focused on what needs to be achieved can prove to be more difficult.  Use the final weeks of the year to work towards tidying up loose ends.   Ask your team to take a last look at their KPI’s, their Project Plans and Strategy Documents and formulate a plan that sees them achieving as much as possible.  Whilst it can be hard to focus members of your team at this point come the New Year you will be glad you did!

2. Think Resolutions and Goals
Now is the time to not only tidy up loose ends but to set goals for the New Year.  In December and January the word on everyone’s lips is resolutions and while it is important to consider what you would like to work on or improve on in the New Year, resolutions have a tendency to be one-week-wonder.  Goal setting is easy when you apply the frame work
SMARTAS: Specific, Measurable, Attractive, Realistic, Time Bound, Agreed and Stretching.  For more information on Goal setting click here Top 5 – To Mastering Goal Setting

3. Thank you’s
Thank you’s are so important, don’t let the year slip away without taking time to thank everyone who has helped and supported you through the year.  The list can be long and it’s not a list you want to leave anyone off who doesn’t deserve your heart felt gratitude, think about your family, your team, your boss, your assistant, clients, suppliers, other departments, the cleaning staff, the maintenance staff, the people who deliver your lunch, the coffee shop owners where you get your much needed morning coffee. Showing gratitude goes a long way to building powerful relationships.

4. Take Some Time Out
With the pressure of the new year’s tasks looming and under the weight of this year’s pressures its vital that you honour your, mental, physical and emotional states and take some time out to recharge the batteries.  It can be easy to quash the need for a break in favour of achieving more.  To easy feelings of tension of taking time away from the office, put plans into place that allow you time off without worrying that the organisation will crumble to its foundations without you (it probably won’t!!).  Having the time to rest and refuel your energy levels, expand your mind and let go of work pressures you can begin the new year refreshed and revitalised.

5. Think of Others
If you are able to leave the office for a well-deserved break consider those still working over the holiday period.  If you have a team try and put in place some treats and surprises which will make their working weeks a little more festive.   Think about allowing them to wear casual clothing or arrange a basket of special snacks, put a TV in the lunch room or leave some petty cash so they can order in lunch.  Whatever you can do to make this time special will be well received.

Happening People are focused all year long on organisations Health and Well Being, not just during the party season.  Our Happening Health Programs aim to give you and your team a balanced and holistic approach to bettering performance.  Call us on 1800 68 67 69 or visit our website www.HappeningPeople.com for more detailed information on our Happening Health Programs.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Corporate Health, Corporate Training, People Management, Professional Development, Team Building

Top 5 – How to be an Awesome Leader

Do you manage your people or do you lead them?  Maybe it is a bit of both? So when do you manage and when do you lead?

There is a real difference between Managers and Leaders, put simply Managers have subordinates and possess a transactional style, their tasks include planning, organising, controlling and reviewing. A Leader has followers and possesses a transformational style (see tip 3) their day is filled with aligning their people and activities to the vision; they are pioneering the way whilst carving out a legacy to be remembered.  Leaders will also have subordinates as they are often managers appointed to roles in an organisational structure however they see their main goal as leading their followers so their style of leadership will be less of a manager and more of a leader.

Other attributes of a leader as opposed to a manager including being a change agents, looking  long term , setting the direction, appealing to hearts and our passions, looking for and encourage others to achieve, sometimes breaking free from rules to achieve and pioneering the way as they seek to do right rather than be right.  Finally they seek the truth and they give credit to their followers.

We offer you our Top 5 on How to Be an Awesome Leader.  If you haven’t done so already, ‘like’ our Facebook Page www.facebook.com/HappeningPeople and be sure to look out for our extra Top Tip- Number 6, which looks at Power and Leadership.

1. Lead from the Front

Leading from the front is described by General Douglas MacArthur who said

“A true leader has the confidence to stand alone, the courage to make tough decisions, and the compassion to listen to the needs of others. He does not set out to be a leader, but becomes one by the equality of his actions and the integrity of his intent.”

The term leading from the front has been bandied about boardrooms for decades, at its most effective it means “I am willing to do, whatever I have asked you to do.’ Leading from the front doesn’t mean huge acts of heroism it means showing your followers you care about the company and their success when they see that you will never ask them to do something, that you are not willing to do yourself.  Leaders who lead from the front are great role models.

2. Show Vision
Great leaders, show leadership by showing the vision.  They do this at every appropriate occasion whether it is in a group or one on one.  By doing this they focus attention on what matters which focuses the team.   When you are able to articulate the vision, meaningful goals can be created. When goals are firmly aligned with the vision the purpose of your team is clear and achievement of the goals is more likely.

3. Possess a Transformational  Style
A good leader is focused on moving its followers towards the vision, they do this by inspiring them to follow not telling them what to do.  Your role is to appeal to their hearts rather than their heads, raise their passions and follow you.  At times you will lead them in directions they haven’t gone before which can be overwhelming for followers.   They will follow you if you show the way and are able to show them the benefits so that your followers will receive more than extrinsic rewards but will become better people along the way.

4. Be People Focused
A good leader does not have to be a loud and overly gregarious one to be effective, in fact many leaders aren’t, rather, they are good with people and are focused on the people rather than the task.  Through their actions and interactions they boost the confidence of those around them to achieve the goals before them and they want to see their followers succeed and take the credit.   Though these methods they inspire loyalty and motivation.

5. Your Legacy
Most people think about their legacy at the end of their careers, awesome leaders think about it throughout their careers.  Pericles famously said ‘What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others.’  Leaders look to leave a legacy through changing the lives of their followers.  Robert Galford and Regina Maruca, authors of “Your Leadership Legacy,” suggest that “thinking about your legacy now makes you a better leader today no matter how far you are from retirement.” This view is based on interviews with people at all organisational levels.  Galford and Maruca advocate we all should be engaged in legacy thinking.

Leaders aren’t just born, good managers become great leaders through being shown the way.  Happening People are award winning  corporate  training specialists and are the Leaders in Leadership Training.  Give us a call on 1800 68 67 69 or visit our website www.happeningpeople.com for more information on how we can help you and your organisation develop awesome leaders.

Leave a comment

Filed under Corporate Training, Human Resources, People Management, Positive Psychology, Professional Development

Top 5 – How to Be a Great Mentor

Not to be confused with a coach a mentor is a peer to peer guide or is often described as someone who has walked the path before others.  If you wanted to be the worlds best swimmer then you would work with the worlds best swimming coach but if you wanted to know what it was like to be the worlds best swimmer then you would talk with someone who has done it and this person is a mentor.

Mentors are people who help the mentee to develop and grow until the mentee feels empowered to function alone.  Mentors do this by providing support, sharing their experiences, knowledge and skills whilst keeping in mind the level of skill and experience the mentee possesses. The relationship between the mentor and the mentee usually unfolds over time and can be formal and informal.

The role of a mentor is one that is best taken seriously for the mentee’s often see their mentor as ‘larger than life’ or the expert and it’s probably healthy for them to see  you in such a way initially to help establish the relationship for they are looking for someone to point the way.  They are often unsure of their abilities through a lack of experience and the mentee seeks to acquire your abilities.  At times you may even feel that the mentee is becoming you.

There are a variety of skills good mentors possess which enables them to have long and successful relationships with their mentees who often go on to be their friends and provide mutual counsel.  If it’s time for you to jump on the mentoring bus or indeed you are already on-board Happening People give you our Top 5 on How to Be a Great Mentor and in this top 5 check out our extra top tip (it’s one you won’t want to miss!) by liking our Facebook page www.facebook.com/happeningpeople

 1. Success is in the structure
Mentoring can be stifled by too much structure.  Many people who engaged in mentoring would not apply the label to their activities.  Some would be embarrassed and inhibited by so naming the relationship.  Very informal one-off instances of advice or short-term mentoring can afford to be totally unstructured.  However it can be lack of structure with no agreed objectives, ground rules or parameters that leads to problems in mentoring. Where a mentoring relationship is recognised and acknowledged as such, a verbal agreement as to the purpose of the relationship is the minimum structure required.  Written agreements can also be valuable.

2. Responsibility of the mentee

Your role as mentor requires you to guide, offer suggestions for improvement, uncover strategies that maybe of use to the mentee and provide them with a sounding board to help them navigate to a successful outcome.  Your role here is not to take over and own the process or become possessive of the outcome.  Ultimately the mentee is responsible for the outcome which you help them facilitate on the side lines.

 3. The 4 phases to mentoring
1. Start up- People seek mentors when they are typically unable to make sense of an experience on their own, they seek mentors to guide them in these situations, to interpret their experiences for them.
2. Development- This is where you will see and hear your mentee being more independent.  This is usually the longest phase in mentoring and offers you the greatest chance to assist in enhancing their skills and knowledge.
3. Separation – This phase begins when the mentee starts to separate from you.  You can expect that they will want to do things by themselves to prove themselves and establish their own identity.  They will be looking to stand-alone. It is usually the most rewarding stage for both the mentor and mentee.
4. Common Ground – Here you will be looking to see that the mentee feels completely at ease without your guidance.  Better yet the mentoring relationship turns into a workplace friendship based on mutual respect and admiration.

 4. The mentees manager
Some specialists in mentoring recommend that the boss should not be the mentor to a subordinate.  However, some boss /subordinate mentoring works extremely well, either in the in the formal or informal sense. This works best when the culture of organisation endorses such behaviour or where the boss regards the staff development as a high performance goal in alignment with their own goals and those of the organisation. If you are not your mentees boss remember your job is to help the mentee develop and grow not to pick holes in how they are being managed.

5. Practice confidentiality
Where the mentor/ mentee relationship commonly falls apart or is severely tested is when there is a breach of confidentiality. Trust is paramount to the success of the relationship and only you can decide how much confidential matter you offer.  At times ethical issues arise in which you may consider breaking confidentiality e.g. organisational security.  At this point it is often best to refer to your organisation policies if a breach occurs.  Legally, the law of land prevails and cases of stealing or harassment, among others, must be reported.

Let Happening People help you and your people develop your mentoring skills by attending our Mentoring  Training Program.  To find out more call us on 1800 68 67 69 or visit our website www.happeningpeople.com

2 Comments

Filed under Corporate Training, Human Resources, Mentoring, People Management, Positive Psychology, Professional Development

Top 5 – How to Get the Most out of Your Coaching Sessions

With over $1 Billion dollars spent yearly on Executive Coaching in the US (Harvard Business Review) such a large investment needs a return. The good news is that when employees who are being invested in really work to get the best out of their coaching sessions the returns are high.

We all know a Personal Trainer won’t lift your weights for you, a Spiritual Guide will not live your life for you and an Executive Coach is not going to do your work for you either, but all of them will guide and support you through the process when you work in collaboration with them.
MetrixGloball LLC a recognised thought leader in the strategic application of coaching said in one study, executive coaching at Booz Allen Hamilton returned $7.90 for every $1 the firm spent on coaching.” This is what you call ‘real bang’ for your buck!

So how can you get the most bang out of your companies Executive Coaching dollars?  Once again Happening People rise to the challenge and answer the question with our Top 5 – Getting the Most Out of Your Executive Coaching Sessions.

1. Bring your Attitude
Hey, when you do bring your attitude, make sure it’s the right one!  Leave the ego at home, you will get much more out of your session if you can be open minded.  Sure, having someone discuss with you your work performance can be difficult at times, but you need to remember that the intention behind coaching is to make you aware of your behaviours and effectiveness to give you the tools to adapt them to best meet everyday challenges.  Throughout this process not only will you discover what needs improvement but what strengths, skills and talents you have that you can build upon to be at your best.

2. Be Selfish
Executive Coaching is an investment in you and what you most want. It is not a time to sit back and worry about others.  The time you dedicate to your coaching is yours and the more effective each session is the more benefit you will provide to others after each session.  That means you may need to push out a deadline or simplify your day.  You will need to put work second when it comes to scheduling your sessions and work to be ‘present and focused’ not just in ‘attendance’ at each session.

3. Set Goals
Whist your Executive Coach will be experienced in leading you through the process of Executive Coaching each coachee is an individual and no two sessions are the same.  Embrace your uniqueness and plan with your coach exactly what you want to achieve and work on a strategy to achieving it. You and your coach need to discuss each other’s role in the process, establish expectations of each other, clarify objectives and establish benchmarks for results.

4. Be Open to Change and New Ideas
Let yourself be challenged, for real growth doesn’t begin till we are outside our comfort zone.  Choose to walk into each session with an open mind and an inquiring spirit. This is your opportunity to learn from those who have walked your path before, someone capable of putting language and structure around your imperfections and provide a plan for the future.

5. Homework
Your Executive Coach will have you try new ideas, approaches, strategies and or communication skills. Make sure you try these out and take note of what worked and what didn’t work each time you try one of these. Committing extra time to looking more in depth at each idea will move you more quickly towards your coaching goals and overall effectiveness.

Want to learn more about the Executive Coaching Happening People Offers?  Click here.

Executive coaching is a way for the leader, manager or executive to be aware of and change their behaviour to meet each situation with effectiveness and to lead with authority, clarity and purpose.
Imagine if you could do all of this?  You can! With a little help from our Executive Coaching Team.
Call Happening People on 1800 68 67 69 or go to www.happeningpeople.com

Leave a comment

Filed under Coaching, Executive Coaching, People Management, Positive Psychology, Professional Development, Uncategorized