Tag Archives: workplace

Top 5 – Motivating Others

followIn today’s highly competitive world, a highly motivated team is vital for any business seeking to be number one.  Therefore it is a critical skill for managers and business leaders to be able to motivate others.

There is a long standing debate that begs the question ‘Do managers actually motivate their staff or are the staff motivated by the environment they are in?

It is more likely the latter, an effective manager and leader has the tools to create and impact the environment of the workplace to ensure it is a positive and sustainable one.

This week’s Top 5 looks at some of the best ways managers can motivate their staff.

1.  Give people responsibility
More than they think they deserve and as much as they are capable of handling. This will empower them assuming they are already motivated. Demonstrating your belief in them will boost their confidence and their beliefs about themselves.

2. Make them feel they matter.
Here are some ways you can instantly make the members of your team feel they matter. Take time for one on ones, use active listening, help them champion causes they believe in and provide feedback, support their career ambitions and ask them ‘what is it that I do that stops you from doing your job?’

3. Communicate, Communicate, Communicate
Knowledge is power and power is motivating. You can never communicate too much but be careful on what and how you deliver the message to avoid  information fatigue. The optimum approach to delivering information is to remember that everyone  should know everything about the business that concerns them.  Ask your staff what they would like to know about and provide them with this information promptly.

4. Treat people with kindness and respect
There is an old adage that says ‘do unto others as you would be done by’. In other words treat people the way you would like to be treated. Demonstrate trust in your team and they will show you trust in return.  There are simple things you can do like ensure ensuring you handle personal problems in a sympathetic yet positive manner. Ensuring your teams salaries and benefits are looked after and paid promptly.

5. Find out what motivates them individually.
No two people are the same; some might like to head home to see family early on a Friday.
Others might like team drinks night once a month. The ability of a manager to recognise what motivates each individual is a contributing factor to the overall teams’ success.  As a manager you need to be aware of what these ‘motivational forces’ are.  Theorist Abraham Maslow grouped them into five areas. 1. Physiological needs (food clothing shelter etc), 2. Safety Needs (a sense of security), 3. Social Needs (interaction with other people; having friends), Esteem Needs (being well regarded and having the appreciation of others) and Self Actualisation (realising individual potential).

Motivating others through affecting the environment takes time and skill.  As a manager these skills can be gained or developed by attending our highly successful and sort after Happening People Leadership Academy.  Start the year with a real boost and develop a highly motivated work force.  We are looking forward to your call! 1800 68 67 69 or find out more by visiting http://www.HappeningPeople.com

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Top 5 – How to Let Go and Enjoy the Festivities While You Work

CrowdAre you careening  head long into the end of the year at warp speeds or are you spinning on the spot in a dizzying spin of deadlines?  Maybe you are heading gracefully to a gentle close or galloping to the post with style?

However you bring the year to a close the conflicting demands of deadlines and festivities are upon us and it can be difficult to navigate a balanced course through the final weeks of the year.  Do not fear Happening People come to your aid with our Top 5 – How to Let Go and Enjoy the Festivities While You Work

1. Tidy Up Loose Ends
As you launch into all the fun and festivities the years end brings it can be easy to get so caught up in the goings on that staying focused on what needs to be achieved can prove to be more difficult.  Use the final weeks of the year to work towards tidying up loose ends.   Ask your team to take a last look at their KPI’s, their Project Plans and Strategy Documents and formulate a plan that sees them achieving as much as possible.  Whilst it can be hard to focus members of your team at this point come the New Year you will be glad you did!

2. Think Resolutions and Goals
Now is the time to not only tidy up loose ends but to set goals for the New Year.  In December and January the word on everyone’s lips is resolutions and while it is important to consider what you would like to work on or improve on in the New Year, resolutions have a tendency to be one-week-wonder.  Goal setting is easy when you apply the frame work
SMARTAS: Specific, Measurable, Attractive, Realistic, Time Bound, Agreed and Stretching.  For more information on Goal setting click here Top 5 – To Mastering Goal Setting

3. Thank you’s
Thank you’s are so important, don’t let the year slip away without taking time to thank everyone who has helped and supported you through the year.  The list can be long and it’s not a list you want to leave anyone off who doesn’t deserve your heart felt gratitude, think about your family, your team, your boss, your assistant, clients, suppliers, other departments, the cleaning staff, the maintenance staff, the people who deliver your lunch, the coffee shop owners where you get your much needed morning coffee. Showing gratitude goes a long way to building powerful relationships.

4. Take Some Time Out
With the pressure of the new year’s tasks looming and under the weight of this year’s pressures its vital that you honour your, mental, physical and emotional states and take some time out to recharge the batteries.  It can be easy to quash the need for a break in favour of achieving more.  To easy feelings of tension of taking time away from the office, put plans into place that allow you time off without worrying that the organisation will crumble to its foundations without you (it probably won’t!!).  Having the time to rest and refuel your energy levels, expand your mind and let go of work pressures you can begin the new year refreshed and revitalised.

5. Think of Others
If you are able to leave the office for a well-deserved break consider those still working over the holiday period.  If you have a team try and put in place some treats and surprises which will make their working weeks a little more festive.   Think about allowing them to wear casual clothing or arrange a basket of special snacks, put a TV in the lunch room or leave some petty cash so they can order in lunch.  Whatever you can do to make this time special will be well received.

Happening People are focused all year long on organisations Health and Well Being, not just during the party season.  Our Happening Health Programs aim to give you and your team a balanced and holistic approach to bettering performance.  Call us on 1800 68 67 69 or visit our website www.HappeningPeople.com for more detailed information on our Happening Health Programs.

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Top 5 – How to Be a Great Mentor

Not to be confused with a coach a mentor is a peer to peer guide or is often described as someone who has walked the path before others.  If you wanted to be the worlds best swimmer then you would work with the worlds best swimming coach but if you wanted to know what it was like to be the worlds best swimmer then you would talk with someone who has done it and this person is a mentor.

Mentors are people who help the mentee to develop and grow until the mentee feels empowered to function alone.  Mentors do this by providing support, sharing their experiences, knowledge and skills whilst keeping in mind the level of skill and experience the mentee possesses. The relationship between the mentor and the mentee usually unfolds over time and can be formal and informal.

The role of a mentor is one that is best taken seriously for the mentee’s often see their mentor as ‘larger than life’ or the expert and it’s probably healthy for them to see  you in such a way initially to help establish the relationship for they are looking for someone to point the way.  They are often unsure of their abilities through a lack of experience and the mentee seeks to acquire your abilities.  At times you may even feel that the mentee is becoming you.

There are a variety of skills good mentors possess which enables them to have long and successful relationships with their mentees who often go on to be their friends and provide mutual counsel.  If it’s time for you to jump on the mentoring bus or indeed you are already on-board Happening People give you our Top 5 on How to Be a Great Mentor and in this top 5 check out our extra top tip (it’s one you won’t want to miss!) by liking our Facebook page www.facebook.com/happeningpeople

 1. Success is in the structure
Mentoring can be stifled by too much structure.  Many people who engaged in mentoring would not apply the label to their activities.  Some would be embarrassed and inhibited by so naming the relationship.  Very informal one-off instances of advice or short-term mentoring can afford to be totally unstructured.  However it can be lack of structure with no agreed objectives, ground rules or parameters that leads to problems in mentoring. Where a mentoring relationship is recognised and acknowledged as such, a verbal agreement as to the purpose of the relationship is the minimum structure required.  Written agreements can also be valuable.

2. Responsibility of the mentee

Your role as mentor requires you to guide, offer suggestions for improvement, uncover strategies that maybe of use to the mentee and provide them with a sounding board to help them navigate to a successful outcome.  Your role here is not to take over and own the process or become possessive of the outcome.  Ultimately the mentee is responsible for the outcome which you help them facilitate on the side lines.

 3. The 4 phases to mentoring
1. Start up- People seek mentors when they are typically unable to make sense of an experience on their own, they seek mentors to guide them in these situations, to interpret their experiences for them.
2. Development- This is where you will see and hear your mentee being more independent.  This is usually the longest phase in mentoring and offers you the greatest chance to assist in enhancing their skills and knowledge.
3. Separation – This phase begins when the mentee starts to separate from you.  You can expect that they will want to do things by themselves to prove themselves and establish their own identity.  They will be looking to stand-alone. It is usually the most rewarding stage for both the mentor and mentee.
4. Common Ground – Here you will be looking to see that the mentee feels completely at ease without your guidance.  Better yet the mentoring relationship turns into a workplace friendship based on mutual respect and admiration.

 4. The mentees manager
Some specialists in mentoring recommend that the boss should not be the mentor to a subordinate.  However, some boss /subordinate mentoring works extremely well, either in the in the formal or informal sense. This works best when the culture of organisation endorses such behaviour or where the boss regards the staff development as a high performance goal in alignment with their own goals and those of the organisation. If you are not your mentees boss remember your job is to help the mentee develop and grow not to pick holes in how they are being managed.

5. Practice confidentiality
Where the mentor/ mentee relationship commonly falls apart or is severely tested is when there is a breach of confidentiality. Trust is paramount to the success of the relationship and only you can decide how much confidential matter you offer.  At times ethical issues arise in which you may consider breaking confidentiality e.g. organisational security.  At this point it is often best to refer to your organisation policies if a breach occurs.  Legally, the law of land prevails and cases of stealing or harassment, among others, must be reported.

Let Happening People help you and your people develop your mentoring skills by attending our Mentoring  Training Program.  To find out more call us on 1800 68 67 69 or visit our website www.happeningpeople.com

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Top 5 – How to Protect your Mental and Emotional Health at Work

With a slew of reality television shows focused on weight loss and a healthy lifestyle when we think health we often only consider our physical health and not our mental and emotional health.

The workplace is a melting pot of high stress situations, poorly managed tensions, disappearing resources  and hidden agendas and of course an abundance of politics.  Our emotional and mental wellbeing is put to the test repeatedly and we can become worn down.  When this occurs disaster strikes and we become unwell, sending us into a negative spiral.  But is it all doom and gloom?

With a little help from some brilliant minds on mental health we have pulled together our Top 5 on How to Protect your Mental and Emotional Health at Work.

1. Nourish good Relationships
Professor Jane Fisher, the Jean Hailes Professor of Women’s Health at Monash states “Close relationships are one of the most important protective factors for mental health…” says Prof Fisher. “Nourish good relationships, be committed to them, and get professional help to address destructive or negative relationships if necessary.”  Your work day is full of interactions, and relies on your ability to develop good and lasting relationships with a wide variety of people.  Focus on developing strong bonds with colleagues, they really understand what you are going through on a day-to-day basis and can act as a great listening post and support system.

2. Be Kind to Yourself
Sally Connolly, a clinical social worker, therapist and co-founder of Counselling Relationships Online.com suggests making a decision to do something nice for yourself every day and stick to it. “For many people it has to be a conscious process,” says Connolly. “They must take time to do it. I often recommend some simple ritual as a way of honouring themselves.” She recommends something as simple as daily meditation to inspire peace and relaxation. Other rituals might involve:
Planning to make your favourite dinner once a week, or getting to work 20 minutes early to enjoy a chat and a coffee with colleagues, maybe it’s about getting off the bus a couple of stops early and enjoying a stroll home on a Friday evening.

3. Laughter is the Best Medicine
Paul E. McGhee, Ph.D. is a pioneer in humour research and says “Your sense of humour is one of the most powerful tools you have to make certain that your daily mood and emotional state support good health.”  Physically laughter relaxes the whole body, laughter boosts the immune system, laughter triggers the release of endorphins and laughter protects the heart. Emotionally laughter dissolves distressing emotions, laughter helps you relax and recharge and humour shifts perspective. At work the benefits of laughter include allowing you to be more spontaneous, let go of defensiveness, release inhibitions allowing you to do your best work and it allows you to express your true feelings.

4. Never Stop Dreaming
Richard Branson Gazillionaire and entrepreneur “…. you need to take the opportunity to focus on the future. Finding time for aspirational thought is vital. … I spend time every day with my notebooks and iPad, thinking over new dreams and ideas.” Your work day can be filled with procedures, guidelines and protocols.  It can be hard to think outside the square with restrictions placed on our thoughts.  Daring to dream broadens the mind and ignites creativity which in turn boosts our confidence, reduces our stress levels and gives us hope.

5. Keep your Job
Building financial security will help protect your mental and emotional state at work.  When you know your financial future is secure it frees your mind of stress and tension that could otherwise jeopardise your health.  David Koch, presenter, finance Journalist and commentator  has been voted by his peers as one of the ten most influential people of all time in the Australian financial services industry he states “…. the increase in joblessness should prompt action to ensure your position at work is secure. Now is the time to make yourself indispensable by learning, increasing awareness of those around you and taking on a bigger role in everything you do.”

Happening People know that good Emotional and Mental Health as well as Physical Health are vital to your overall well-being and that of your team and organisation which is why we offer Happening Health a program aimed at helping organisations become employers of choice by offering a holistic approach to their employees’ wellbeing.  If you would like to know more or to book a session please call us on 1800 68 67 69 or check out our website www.happeningpeople.com

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